Benjamin is merely a low-end WR3 until we see some more consistency from him and the entire Panthers offense

Kelvin Benjamin, Panthers: See Newton, Cam. Benjamin needed a terrific catch to score last week but still caught only two passes and, prior to last week, had gone eight straight games with single-digit points. Again, with the Seahawks defense back at home and at full strength finally, I think this is a long day for the Panthers and their players. Benjamin is merely a low-end WR3 until we see some more consistency from him and the entire Panthers offense.

Allen Robinson, Jaguars: With just 11 targets total to Robinson in the past two games, it’s clear Blake Bortles is really bortling his relationship with A-Rob. Robinson has just five receptions in those two weeks (though one of them was a touchdown) and this is, shall we say, not a great matchup for a passing offense that is struggling.

Which wide receivers have the easiest and toughest matchups in Week 13? Check out the downloadable PDF cheat sheet listing every matchup to help with your fantasy football decisions.

Also, be sure to take advantage of our Roster Advisor tool to get an edge on your opponents. And for those taking part in the Eliminator Challenge, you can get an edge here, too, with the Survivor Guide.

Our weekly ESPN Insider cheat sheet provides a rundown of the greatest hits from all of our Insider fantasy football content. In this file, you’ll find answers to the top questions of the week, along with injury updates, matchup advantages and wild-card plays from Eric Karabell, Tristan H. Cockcroft, Matt Bowen, Scott Kacsmar and Mike Clay. It’s all the best tips, distilled into one handy file.

Some things you can’t predict — like the Dallas Cowboys losing by one in the opener and then rattling off 11 wins in a row with a rookie fourth-round quarterback leading the way.

The Cowboys did it again Thursday night, escaping with a 17-15 win on the road in Minnesota to keep the win streak alive. It was a game that didn’t feature huge stats by anyone, but Ezekiel Elliott (86 yards rushing and a touchdown) and Dez Bryant (four catches, 84 yards and a touchdown) both came out just fine.

For those things that are a little easier to predict than the magical Cowboys season, our team of Insiders has a whole bunch of tips and nuggets you don’t want to miss.

Chiefs proud of Tyreek Hill on and off field

Chiefs coach Andy Reid repeated on Wednesday what has become his standard line when discussing Tyreek Hill of late, as the rookie wide receiver has become a larger part of the Kansas City offense.

In talking about Hill winning this week’s AFC offensive player of the week award after his two offensive touchdowns in Sunday night’s win over the Denver Broncos, Reid said he’s “more proud of him for what he’s doing off the field than on the field.”

Hill is on probation in Oklahoma because of a December 2014 incident, after which he pleaded guilty to punching and choking his pregnant girlfriend. The Chiefs drafted him in the fifth round anyway, sparking considerable controversy in Kansas City. With the passage of time, the criticism has diminished to an extent.

In addition to Brady and Gronkowski not practicing, wide receiver Julian Edelman also wasn’t spotted at Wednesday’s practice. He’s been managing a foot injury since Oct. 6.

Even worse is when there’s no emotion at all, a clear sign that players have already checked out. Newton says the Panthers, despite their record, still have the best locker room he’s ever experienced. With that one ingredient, even the pipe dream of a worst-to-first run after Thanksgiving remains alive. “That’s why the locker room is so important,” Rivera says. “There’s a direct correlation between how you do on the field and the pulse you feel from inside that room.”

Rivera’s room didn’t truly begin to take shape until January 2013. The Panthers had finished 7-9 in the 2012 season, and the clock was ticking on the second-year coach. Rivera invited a handful of team leaders to dinner in Charlotte. After a few appetizers, he asked them to do an autopsy on the season, focusing on the bad vibe in the locker room. The players responded with prolonged silence. “So again, ‘Guys, come on, what’s going on in there?'”

Rivera grew up in a military family-his father, Eugenio, served 32 years in the Army, including two tours in Vietnam-and he once had a group of retired Air Force pilots speak to the team.

At dinner, Rivera reminded his players about the story of how the pilots would peel off their ranks after every mission, throw them on the table and talk openly about one another’s performances. “Then the floodgates just opened,” Rivera says. “At first I was like, ‘Golly, screw you guys, why didn’t you tell me any of this during the season?'”